Wednesday, 04 November 2015
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Need help identifying a plant? Post a picture here and someone will help you.
4 years ago
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#206
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What a nice blue color! Looks like Veronica chamaedrys, aka germander speedwell.
3 years ago
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#207
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The color of flowers is very nice.
1 year ago
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#208
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Thanks, I found a solution to my problem in this discussion!
1 year ago
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#209
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Hello, I was walking in the forest and found such a flower, there is an assumption, what is it called?
[attachment]flower-scilla-forest-flower-nature-forest-plant.jpg[/attachment]
1 year ago
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#210
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Hi! What a beauty. I uploaded your photos to iNaturalist and it suggests it's Germander Speedwell in the Veronica genus. There are a number of similar looking plants in the Veronica genus so I'd poke around some more within that classification. Here's the link to that species info from iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/51610-Veronica-chamaedrys We have a blog about using iNaturalist for plant and animal IDing. It's my favorite tool! Check it out here: https://mywoodlot.com/item/using-the-inaturalist-app-to-almost-solve-a-mystery
Happy botanizing!
Tyler from the MyWoodlot Team
1 year ago
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#211
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Hi there - i forwarded your message to one of our partners at Cornell Cooperative Extension who is very good at woodland plant ID and here is her response:

"Ooo- This is a tricky one. I think there are parts of multiple plants in this photo which may confuse iNaturalist a bit, and perhaps us as well! I would guess that the blooms are on a spike with basal leaves, one of which we can see on the left- think of hyacinth leaves. The blue flowers have not yet fully opened so it’s hard to see the detail needed to really be sure who exactly this is. The round leaved creeping plant in the background on the left could definitely be a speedwell.
I was at first reminded of bluebells which use to be a member of the scilla family. After investigating the Scilla genus, I am thinking it is Siberian Scuilla or something closely related. An additional similarity is the red coloring in the flower spike. This is most likely an escapee from cultivation. Below is a photo of Siberian Scuilla for comparison."
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