Blog

A 100-Year Garden: Weeding

Tom Pavlesich Monday, 07 August 2017

A 100-Year Garden: Weeding

There are a lot of reasons for weeding my woods. Increasing food for wildlife, nest habitat for birds, or timber to sell are a few. Careful weeding can even help speed my woods’ transition to that cherished and extremely rare type of woods: old growth.

How Many Snags Should My Woods Have for Wildlife?

Joshua VanBrakle Monday, 31 July 2017

How Many Snags Should My Woods Have for Wildlife?

You might think dead trees in your woods mean something is wrong. But death is part of the woods, and dead trees, called snags, are important for a host of wildlife.

A Walk in the Rain

Tom Pavlesich Monday, 24 July 2017

A Walk in the Rain

When you walk your trails on a dry sunny day, you might think they’re fine, that they have no chance of washing away. But take a walk in the rain, and you may be surprised with how much erosion is going on.

Quaking Aspen: The Supertree

Joshua VanBrakle Monday, 17 July 2017

Quaking Aspen: The Supertree

Like any superhero, quaking aspen has a mild-mannered alter ego that makes people discount it. Yet behind its trembling exterior, the unassuming “popple” has amazing powers.

Confident in Camo

Joshua VanBrakle Monday, 10 July 2017

Confident in Camo

People aren’t the only ones who get suckered into blind faith in their camo. Animals can fall victim to the same overconfidence.

MyWoodlot Health Alert: Don’t Get Burned by Wild Parsnip

Karl VonBerg Monday, 03 July 2017

MyWoodlot Health Alert: Don’t Get Burned by Wild Parsnip

Wild parsnip is an invasive, poisonous plant native to Europe and Asia. You can save yourself a lot of pain if you learn to spot and avoid it.

Recommended Read: Farming the Woods

Joshua VanBrakle Monday, 26 June 2017

Recommended Read: Farming the Woods

For a thorough introduction to the many ways you can grow food in the woods, there’s no beating Ken Mudge and Steve Gabriel’s excellent book Farming the Woods: An Integrated Permaculture Approach to Growing Food and Medicinals in Temperate Forests.

Guest Voice: Outdoor Artist Interviews #4 – Diana Hartel

Diana Hartel Monday, 12 June 2017

Guest Voice: Outdoor Artist Interviews #4 – Diana Hartel

Our guest blog series by students from Columbia University’s Earth Institute concludes with an interview of Diana Hartel. Diana is an artist, author, and former environmental epidemiologist for Columbia University.

Guest Voice: Outdoor Artist Interviews #3 – Susan Roth

Susan Roth Monday, 05 June 2017

Guest Voice: Outdoor Artist Interviews #3 – Susan Roth

In this third guest blog from our friends at Columbia University’s Earth Institute, the students interview Susan Roth. Susan is an urban planner, outdoor painter, and a member of the Wallkill River School of Art.

Eastern Tent Caterpillar: Problem in the Woods?

Joshua VanBrakle Monday, 29 May 2017

Eastern Tent Caterpillar: Problem in the Woods?

On a recent drive through the woods, I saw trees loaded with eastern tent caterpillar tents. When landowners see these tents on their trees, they often worry: are my trees doomed? And what can I do to save them?

Guest Voice: Outdoor Artist Interviews #2 – Shawn Dell Joyce

Shawn Dell Joyce Monday, 22 May 2017

Guest Voice: Outdoor Artist Interviews #2 – Shawn Dell Joyce

Our guest blog series from Columbia University students continues. This week they interview Shawn Dell Joyce, a painter, educator, and founder of the Wallkill River School of Art, a nonprofit that offers outdoor painting workshops on open spaces and small farms.

Need a Break? Find Two Trees

Tyler Van Fleet Monday, 15 May 2017

Need a Break? Find Two Trees

I love setting up my hammock in the park near my apartment in Queens. I can turn an urban park into my very own woodland oasis with a few pieces of basic equipment. Want to get into the swing of things? Follow these steps.

Guest Voice: Outdoor Artist Interviews #1 – Elissa Gore

Elissa Gore Monday, 08 May 2017

Guest Voice: Outdoor Artist Interviews #1 – Elissa Gore

Last fall, we teamed up with Columbia University students to create new outdoor projects we could share. The students came through with information on painting or drawing in nature, called plein air art. They also interviewed four artists to get their perspective on the value of creating art outside.

To See Birds, Embrace Bugs

Josh VanBrakle Monday, 01 May 2017

To See Birds, Embrace Bugs

Take away bugs, and it doesn’t matter how much seed you put out. You aren’t providing what birds really need. 96% of North America’s terrestrial birds depend on insects, spiders, and the like to feed their young.

A Tale of Two Trees: Why Protecting Planted Trees Matters

Tom Foulkrod Monday, 24 April 2017

A Tale of Two Trees: Why Protecting Planted Trees Matters

Here at MyWoodlot, one of the most common reasons we hear why people don’t use tree tubes or bark protectors is that they can be eyesores. But while they might look bad for a few years, they’re worth it in the long run, as I discovered with two larches I planted.

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