Wildlife Improvement

Are you interested in improving wildlife food sources or habitat on your property? MyWoodlot has a multitude of related blogs to spark your interest. If your woodlot is in the NYC Watershed (find out here), a wildlife improvement project(s) may be eligible for cost-share funding through the WAC Forestry Program’s Management Assistance Program (MAP) for forest landowners. Check out the MAP application for program requirements.

Helping Little Oaks Become Big Oaks

Karl VonBerg Wednesday, 04 November 2020

Helping Little Oaks Become Big Oaks

Do you have small oak trees (< 6’) that you would like to see grow into large oaks that produce many acorns?  Does it seem like they never really grow taller?  Find out how to solve that problem.  

Freeing or Lighting Oaks

Karl VonBerg Wednesday, 28 October 2020

Freeing or Lighting Oaks

Do you want to keep your oak trees healthy? Here are ways to give them the space and light they need to grow and produce an abundance of acorns.

Dead and Dying Trees: Why I’m leaving some but not others

Brendan Murphy Wednesday, 10 July 2019

Dead and Dying Trees: Why I’m leaving some but not others

Guest-author Brendan Murphy is torn between two loves: bonfires and pileated woodpeckers.

A 100-Year Garden: Weeding

Tom Pavlesich Monday, 07 August 2017

A 100-Year Garden: Weeding

There are a lot of reasons for weeding my woods. Increasing food for wildlife, nest habitat for birds, or timber to sell are a few. Careful weeding can even help speed my woods’ transition to that cherished and extremely rare type of woods: old growth.

How Many Snags Should My Woods Have for Wildlife?

Joshua VanBrakle Monday, 31 July 2017

How Many Snags Should My Woods Have for Wildlife?

You might think dead trees in your woods mean something is wrong. But death is part of the woods, and dead trees, called snags, are important for a host of wildlife.

"Wild" Apple Trees

Joshua VanBrakle Monday, 03 October 2016

When you look at your woods, you might think they’re a wild place, but there are marks of people’s influence all over them. Some are obvious, like cabins and trails. But others are so subtle, you might not even realize that they have a human history.

Old Fields, Young Woods

Tom Pavlesich Monday, 29 August 2016

Old Fields, Young Woods

Abandoned fields, with their patchy shrubs and short trees, may not be as pretty or easy to walk through as older woods, but these "young woods” provide homes for many kinds of wildlife that can survive almost nowhere else.

How to Convert Your Old Log Landing into a Wildlife Food Plot

Tom Pavlesich Monday, 04 April 2016

How to Convert Your Old Log Landing into a Wildlife Food Plot

Every timber harvest has an area where logs are sorted and then loaded onto trucks for delivery to a sawmill. These areas are called landings, and they are more impacted by logging than any other part of a harvest because of all the equipment driving around. Right after a harvest, a landing can look messy, with the plants worn away and bare dirt exposed. But these areas don’t have to stay messy.