Your woodlot is alive. It supports everything from birds to bugs, flowers to fungi, microbes to mammals. Discover the many ways nature depends on your land, and find out how you can make it even more attractive to wildlife.

Add Native Plants to My Garden

The best way to help pollinators is to provide more of the food that they need to survive. Native plants can support hundreds more species of pollinators than non-native ornamentals, so as much as possible, incorporate native plants into your garden and landscaping.

Add Native Plants to My Garden
Attract Songbirds

The flute-clear notes of a wood thrush. The aerial acrobatics of an American woodcock. Your woodlot can support an astonishing variety of birds, but different birds have different needs. If you want to see more birds, create greater variety on your property.

Attract Songbirds
Build a Bee Nesting House

More than 4,000 species of bees are native to North America, and most don’t form hives and rarely sting. You can help bees by building or buying a wood or bamboo nesting house for them. Note: due to fungal infestations, replace your bee nesting houses every 2-3 years.

Build a Bee Nesting House
Build a Wood Duck Box

Most ducks nest on the ground, but wood ducks nest in tree cavities. You can attract these beautiful waterfowl to your pond by building and installing a simple nest box for them.

Build a Wood Duck Box
Clean My Bird Boxes

Just setting up a bird nesting box isn’t enough to keep birds using it. Periodic cleaning will reduce nest parasites and improve the health of both adult and baby birds.

Clean My Bird Boxes
Convert Some Lawn to Young Woods

Huge lawns have little wildlife value. If you have an expansive lawn on your property, save yourself some mowing and let part of that lawn transition to young woods.

Convert Some Lawn to Young Woods
Create Snags with Girdling

If your woods are short on snags (standing dead trees), you can create some of this valuable wildlife habitat by girdling trees. Girdling kills a tree while leaving it standing so it can become a snag.

Create Snags with Girdling
Create Young Woods through Timber Harvesting

If your property is entirely wooded, your only option to create some young forest may be through careful timber harvesting methods, such as patch cuts.

Create Young Woods through Timber Harvesting
Decide Which Trees to Plant

The first and most important step when taking on a tree-planting project is to choose the tree species that will meet your needs as well as have a good chance of surviving in the spot you intend to plant them.

Decide Which Trees to Plant
Discover the Value of Dead Trees

You may think your dead and fallen trees are eyesores that need to be cleaned up, but a few dead trees benefit your woodlot in lots of ways.

Discover the Value of Dead Trees
Discover the Value of Old-Growth Forest

We hear a lot about how valuable old-growth forests are for wildlife, but what makes them such great places for animals? Once you know that, you can mimic those same traits in your own woods.

Discover the Value of Old-Growth Forest
Discover the Value of Young Woods

Old fields, shrublands, and brushy areas of young trees may lack the majesty of older forests, but they’re important food and cover sources for many birds and other wildlife.

Discover the Value of Young Woods
Do a Patch Cut

True old-growth forests have greenery at every level from the forest floor to the top of the canopy. You can start some new growth on the ground using small patch cuts, which remove every tree from an area less than an acre.

Do a Patch Cut
Establish Wildlife Crop Trees

Trees provide food, dens, and nest sites for wildlife, but some trees are more useful to animals than others. Once you find trees that provide the most value to wildlife, you can cut adjacent trees to give the remaining ones more room to grow.

Establish Wildlife Crop Trees
Find My Vernal Pools

Vernal pools are unique wetlands that only have water part of the year. Though often hard to spot, vernal pools provide critical breeding habitat for amphibians. Learn to recognize vernal pools and discover what you can do to protect yours.

Find My Vernal Pools
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