Written By Marilyn Wyman.

Posted on August 31st, 2017.

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In my 10 years of providing training to help loggers be safer and more profitable, I have met some exceptional guys. Ray Tallman was one of them.

Note from MyWoodlot Editor Josh VanBrakle: Ray Tallman was a logger in our region who passed away recently. Ray played a big role in supporting Trained Logger Certification, a training program we have in New York that helps loggers be safer, more profitable, and more environmentally friendly in the woods. We’re privileged to honor Ray’s memory with this brief piece by longtime logger trainer Marilyn Wyman.

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Ray Tallman (left) talks with another logger at a training event.

In my 10 years of providing training to help loggers be safer and more profitable, I have met some exceptional guys. Ray Tallman was one of them. Ray was educated as a forester and applied this knowledge to his logging business.

Ray was always willing to host a logger training and went out of his way to make the experience a good one. He offered his equipment and his expertise without hesitation.

In addition to supporting logger trainings, he was also a key person I would go to if there was a project I was working on that needed a logger to be interviewed. His input was open, honest, and informed. He didn’t tolerate inappropriate logging, and he held himself to high standards regarding harvesting practices. He truly enjoyed what he did and understood the importance of his message that reflected his principles. Woods were to be managed in a way that ensured future harvests of high quality timber. Because many of his landowner clients were local, they needed to trust Ray, and they did.

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Ray hard at work bucking up logs on a landing.

The most important thing to Ray was his family. His wife Linda was also his business partner, as Ray didn’t do “that email thing.” He had great pride for his daughter Rebecca, who I know he wished could have had a teaching job closer to home.

He also cared deeply about his crew. Ray would tease them at trainings, pointing out mishaps that had recently occurred in a humorous way. But behind the wit and good humor, he always made sure the guys knew his top concern was their safety.

I will miss Ray but am comforted that we will continue to work with Linda, who wonderfully will be keeping the business going. She has reassured us that they will support logger trainings, which mattered so much to Ray. I was touched by the mention of these trainings in Ray’s obituary. We will not forget his dedication to good logging and good will.


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